7 Ways Montessori Education Differs from Traditional Schools

Originally Published on WRAL by Lisa A’romondoa

When people hear the term “Montessori” they usually have a specific idea of what that term means in reference to an academic learning environment, but how does a Montessori education actually differ from that of traditional public and private schools?

1. Student-Directed Learning Under the guidance of teachers and with classrooms designed to promote curiosity, children at Montessori schools are encouraged to be self-motivating. The idea is that through challenging students to investigate what interests them, they will be more engaged and excited to learn. Kevin McLean, head of middle and upper schools at the Montessori School of Raleigh, described this student-directed concept of teaching: “We provide just enough info, tools and skills that allow students to work through the materials at their own pace, and through that process come to a better understanding of that material,” he said.

2. Multi-Age Classrooms 3/13/2019 7 ways Montessori is different from traditional schools :: WRAL.com https://www.wral.com/7-ways-montessori-is-different-from-traditional-schools/18225429/?fbclid=IwAR3DkZTinoxkMAvo0hWXlFL6BSNYqryYoBizkY8PRi24Wqr0GzQ26Cdcy-A 4/7 In traditional schools, children are typically grouped with others their same age. In Montessori schools, children are placed into multi-age classrooms, typically in three-year age groups. “There is a lot of research about peer-to-peer learning. You tap into huge potential when you allow that. Most schools aren’t designed that way,” said Jeannie Norris, interim head of school at the Montessori School of Raleigh. With this multi-age classroom, students are taught from an early age the skills needed for role modeling, helping others and being accessible. Every third year, the cycle begins again as students first gain wisdom from the older students in the classroom before becoming role models themselves in their third year.

3. Hands-On Learning Children at Montessori schools are given an active role in their education with hands-on lessons conceived to help them discover information on their own. This physical learning style is more active than traditional lecture-style learning where children listen and memorize information.

4. Integrated Subjects 3/13/2019 7 ways Montessori is different from traditional schools :: WRAL.com https://www.wral.com/7-ways-montessori-is-different-from-traditional-schools/18225429/?fbclid=IwAR3DkZTinoxkMAvo0hWXlFL6BSNYqryYoBizkY8PRi24Wqr0GzQ26Cdcy-A 5/7 The Montessori curriculum focuses on integrating diverse concepts across subject matter as children progress in grades. The goal is for students to learn skills through repetition but within different contexts to understand how several subjects are connected.

5. Project-Based “Projects give students the opportunity to think beyond the textbook,” McLean said. By introducing information in a lesson, then following it up with a demonstration of that information in the form of a project, students actively use what they learn and apply it. Projects are integrated into subjects as well as into larger efforts. “Passion Projects” in English class at the Montessori School of Raleigh, for example, are opportunities for students to discover what they are passionate about through exploring types of employment, first in research and then in a visit to see what that specific career would look like. Students also explore community service with year-long projects to figure out how they want to make a difference. 3/13/2019 7 ways Montessori is different from traditional schools :: WRAL.com https://www.wral.com/7-ways-montessori-is-different-from-traditional-schools/18225429/?fbclid=IwAR3DkZTinoxkMAvo0hWXlFL6BSNYqryYoBizkY8PRi24Wqr0GzQ26Cdcy-A 6/7

6. School/Classroom Design Montessori classrooms are deliberately designed for each developmental level to provide students with age-appropriate choices in how they want to learn and explore. If students want to work in groups, there are areas for that; if students want to work alone, they can find solitude. Each subject matter is organized into its own clearly-defined space and put together to encourage students to use materials to learn a certain lesson.

7. Real World Collaboration “We don’t just pack their brains and see how much they can memorize,” Norris said. “We prepare them to be self-directed and have the skill set to communicate and collaborate to get the job done.” Will Kelly, a former student of the Montessori School of Raleigh, explained this concept in an example from his sixth-grade class trip to New York City. 3/13/2019 7 ways Montessori is different from traditional schools :: WRAL.com https://www.wral.com/7-ways-montessori-is-different-from-traditional-schools/18225429/?fbclid=IwAR3DkZTinoxkMAvo0hWXlFL6BSNYqryYoBizkY8PRi24Wqr0GzQ26Cdcy-A 7/7

“The students plan the trip and coordinate everything,” he said. “We had to do the directions, lead the way, navigate the subway and the city. The teachers were there, but it was a do-it-yourself trip, which made it more meaningful.” Montessori is not a one-size-fits-all learning approach, and many parents and children have reaped the benefits of this non-traditional learning approach.

Project-Based “Projects give students the opportunity to think beyond the textbook,” McLean said. By introducing information in a lesson, then following it up with a demonstration of that information in the form of a project, students actively use what they learn and apply it. Projects are integrated into subjects as well as into larger efforts. “Passion Projects” in English class at the Montessori School of Raleigh, for example, are opportunities for students to discover what they are passionate about through exploring types of employment, first in research and then in a visit to see what that specific career would look like. Students also explore community service with year-long projects to figure out how they want to make a difference.

3/13/2019 7 ways Montessori is different from traditional schools :: WRAL.com https://www.wral.com/7-ways-montessori-is-different-from-traditional-schools/18225429/?fbclid=IwAR3DkZTinoxkMAvo0hWXlFL6BSNYqryYoBizkY8PRi24Wqr0GzQ26Cdcy-A 6/7

6. School/Classroom Design Montessori classrooms are deliberately designed for each developmental level to provide students with age-appropriate choices in how they want to learn and explore. If students want to work in groups, there are areas for that; if students want to work alone, they can find solitude. Each subject matter is organized into its own clearly-defined space and put together to encourage students to use materials to learn a certain lesson. 7. Real World Collaboration “We don’t just pack their brains and see how much they can memorize,” Norris said. “We prepare them to be self-directed and have the skill set to communicate and collaborate to get the job done.” Will Kelly, a former student of the Montessori School of Raleigh, explained this concept in an example from his sixth-grade class trip to New York City.

7 ways Montessori is different from traditional schools :: WRAL.com https://www.wral.com/7-ways-montessori-is-different-from-traditional-schools/18225429/?fbclid=IwAR3DkZTinoxkMAvo0hWXlFL6BSNYqryYoBizkY8PRi24Wqr0GzQ26Cdcy-A 7/7

“The students plan the trip and coordinate everything,” he said. “We had to do the directions, lead the way, navigate the subway and the city. The teachers were there, but it was a do-it-yourself trip, which made it more meaningful.” Montessori is not a one-size-fits-all learning approach, and many parents and children have reaped the benefits of this non-traditional learning approach.

The Garden Montessori in Pinehurst Lead Teacher Position

The Garden Montessori
Lead Guide: Toddler Community
Full or Part-Time/Long Term Position (IMMEDIATE; December 2018)
Seeking experienced early childhood professionals with previous experience who have completed or are in the process of completing Montessori training for ages 0-3yrs. Candidates should have experience specifically with the 18-36 month age group, should be willing to utilize positive discipline and/or RIE methods, should be equipped with lots of patience, a love of the outdoors and a love of young children. 
Salary: Negotiable; One month paid vacation per year plus one sick day per month
Location: Pinehurst, NC
(910)315-0990

Heartwood Montessori School in Cary, NC

Seeking a Montessori Teacher with 3-6 OR 6-9 Certification for a Transition Classroom for children 5-7 years of age for the 2018-19 school year. Successful candidates will be passionate about education and dedicated to sharing the Montessori method with a new generation. Current Montessori 3-6 and/or 6-9 certification and experience required.  Contact Sue Daniel    sue@heartwoodmontessori.com

Children’s House Teacher Assistant @ Sterling Montessori

Children’s House Teacher Assistant

Sterling’s Children’s House is currently seeking a teacher assistant in its Pre-K/Kindergarten classroom. In order to be eligible for employment as an assistant at Sterling Montessori Academy and Charter School, an applicant must meet the following criteria:

  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Embrace Montessori Theory and Practice

Duties include but are not limited to:

  • Supporting the work of the lead teacher
  • Assisting the lead teacher in the preparation of curriculum materials
  • Assisting the lead teacher in preparing and maintaining a Montessori environment
  • Working with individual as well as small groups of children as directed by the lead teacher.

Interested applicants should submit their resume to: jspreher@sterlingmontessori.org

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S T E R L I N G    M O N T E S S O R I
A c a d e m y  a n d  C h a r t e r  S c h o o l
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202  T r e y b r o o k e  D r i v e,  M o r r i s v i l l e , NC 27560

2018 Winter Montessori Conference: 3-12-2018

Dear Friends,

We have the Sign Up Genius ready for you and your staff to register for our Winter Conference on March 17th.  Please pass along the information to your staff and others who may be interested as appropriate. The link has also been posted on our TMSA Facebook Group.
REGISTRATION CLOSES MONDAY, MARCH 12, 2018
Questions? Choose the appropriate resource (It takes a village!):
Questions re: the event: Janet Weed janetweed.tmsa@gmail.com
Questions re: lunch: Dominique Mouthon dominique@followthechild.org
Questions re: the sign up genius or payment: Angela Bailey abailey@imsnc.org
We hope to see you there!

 

Angela J. Bailey

Head of School

International Montessori School

3001 Academy Road, Building 300

Durham, NC 27707

 

Dave Carmen Scholarship 2018 for Montessori Teachers

TMSA heads and Alumni,
It is that time of year again to share the Dave Carman Music Scholarship opportunity with your teachers and staff.  This scholarship is near and dear to my heart and I would very much appreciate if you could spread the word.  This year, we have raised the scholarship amount to $600 in an effort to bring increased musical opportunities into our wonderful Montessori classrooms.

Please share this email and the attached application document with your staff.  The application deadline is February 25, 2018.  This year, I will collect all applications via this email, but the scholarship decision will be made by committee (similar to years past).